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FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Vol. 34 January 11, 1937 No. 2 



LATE CABLES ... 

Indian flaxseed area, first estimate for 1937, placed 
at 2,756,000 acres, compared with estimate of 2,530,000 acres 
at this time last year, and final estimate of 3,402,000 acres 
for 1936 crop. (Director of Statistics, Calcutta, January 4, 
1937. ) 

British Board of Trade announces frozen pork alloca- 
tion to United States for first quarter of 1937 at nearly 
4,600.000 pounds, approximately the same as that granted for 
corresponding 1936 period. Of the total allocation, the 
usual 257,600 pounds may be imported for curing. (Assistant 
Agricultural Attach^ P. G. Minneman, London, January 8, 
1937. ) 

France allots to the United States for the first 
quarter of 1937 the following import quotas: Apples and 
pears 191,357 quintals (842,162 bushels) and oranges 2,117 
quintals (about 233 short tons). These quotas are allotted 
under terms of the Reciprocal Trade Agreement concluded be- 
tween the two countries in June 1936. (American Commercial 
Attach6, Paris, January 5, 1937.) 

Sydney, Australia, wool sales closed January 7 with 
prices 5 percent higher than at the opening of this series 
on January 4. The outstanding feature was the strong Jap- 
anese buying. (Assistant Agricultural Attache, P. G. Minne- 
man, London, January 7, 1937.) 



14 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, Fp. 2 



BREAD GRAINS 
Summary of production estimat es 

The 1936-37 wheat crop in 42 countries for which estimates have 
"been received totals 3,324,343,000 "bushels as compared with 3,410,800,000 
"bushels produced "by the same countries in 1935-36, when they acccanted for 
about 96 percent of the estimated world total, excluding China and the 
Soviet Union. A decline of 6 percent occurred in the northern Hemisphere 
countries, most of the major producing areas having suffered from drought 
or other adverse growing conditions. A gain of 31 percent is indicated in 
the Southern Hemisphere, where the increase in the Argentine crop more than 
offsets decreases in Australia and the Union of South Africa. The 1936-37 
rye crop is also considerably smaller than that harvested in 1935-36. Esti- 
mates for 31 co-ontries, excluding China and the Soviet Union, total 907,498,- 
000 bushels as against 971,610,000 bushels reported by the same countries in 
1935-36. 

BREAD GRADIS: Production, 1933-34 to 1936-37 



Country ; 1933-34 


: 1934-35 


: 1935-36 


; 1936-37 


; 1,000 

TJheat ; bushels 


; 1,000 
• bushels 
: 526,393 
' 275,849 
10.950 


: 1 , 000 
• "bp-^hels 
; 626 , 344 
; 277,339 
; 10,712 


■; 1,DUD 
; bushels 
: 626,461 
' 233,500 
' 12,993 


Total (3) : 845,697 

Danube Basin (4) • 367,463 


813J.92 
1,297,007 
249,300 


: 914,^95 
ri , 273 , 037 
: 301,690 


: 872^954 
: 1,097,882 
' 382,179 


To tal ETJ..rop e , Exc . U . S . S . R. . : .L, 742,867 


1^546^307 
134,170 
499,201 


ri', 574, 727 
113,324 
504,540 


'1,4867661 ' 
"~~^94,4i8'" 
_ 477,717 
"2,925,150 


N. Hemisphere (39) ; 3,.l?0j_148_. 


2,992,870 


3,106,986 


240", 669 
133,393 
16,936 


141,021 
142,598 
20,195 


249 , 855 
133,525 
15,813 




--__390^998 ^ 
3^383^868 ^ 

17,070 .' 
4,706 : 
847,232 : 
46,814 : 


303_^14 
3 . 410 . 806" 

58,597 
9,606 . 
833,021 
56,861 ; 


399 J93 
'3jl324_^343 

25,554 
4,368 
798,736 
62,424 
861,160"' 
' 14' 
7 , 544 
8,858 


Total Europe, Exc. U. S. S.Ri. 1.003.046 : 


894,046 i 
"' 45 ; 

9,589 ; 
15^87 ; 


889 ,882 1 

17 ; 

8,508 : 
5j000 • 




941,243 : 


971,610 ; 


907,498 



Januaiy 11, 1937 



roreign Crops and Markets 



15 



the ShaUighai wheat market 

yheat and flour prices at Shanghai declined somewhat during the 
last week of Decemher "but made a slight gain early in January, according 
to information received by radio from the Shanghai office of the Bureau 
of Agricultural Economics. Arrivals of domestic wheat from the interior 
were negligible , hut it was estimated that the Shanghai mills had enough 
grain on hand to operate at about 50-percent capacity through February. 
The demand for flour continued weak, and stocks increased to about 900,000 
bags . 

The best quality of domestic spot wheat was ciuoted at Shanghai 
during the 2 weeks ended January 4 at $1.08 per bushel, and Australian 
wheat averaged about $1,31. TTheat futures on December 29 ranged from 
$1.10 per bushel for February delivery to $1.16 for April. Spot flour 
Was $1.26 per bag of 49 pounds; the February future on December 26 was $1.27, 
the April future $1.28 per bag. Australian flour, c.i.f . Hong Kong, was 
$5.25 per barrel of 196 pounds. VTneat imports into China duriug November 
totaled less than 500 bushels and came from Australia. Imports of flour 
for the month, as compared with November 1935, were as follows: 

T7HEAT FLOUR: Imports into China, November 1935-1936 



! Import s 

Country of origin ; November 1935 . November 1936 

; Barrels I Barrel s 

Australia : ■ 9,000 i 7,000 

Canada j 13,000 i 10,000 

United States : 4,000 • 3,000 

Others ; 1,000 \ 1,000 

To tal , . . ' 27,000 21,000 



German grain duties reduced 

Correction : On page 3 of the January 4 issue there appeared a 
table showing reductions in German grain duties. The reduced amounts 
were correct but they apply only to grain imported through a Government- 
designated, institution and should have been compared with the reduced 
rates previously in effect on such imports. It appears that the general 
rates still apply to ordinary imports. The table should read: 



Kind 


Import duty 


of 


General 


Special rate 


grain 


rate 


Prior to Jan. 1. 1937 


Jazi. 1 to A'og. 31, 193 




Cents per bushel 


Cents per bushel 


Cents per bushel 


VJhe at 


333.25 


93.08 


10.95 


Bye. ... 


204.40 


61.32 


10.22 


Spelt 


383.25 


93,08 


10.95 


Barley 


175.20 


52.56 


S.76 


Oats. 


93.44 


35.04 


5.84 



16 : Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, No. 2 



. _ COTTON , 
■ ' Japanese takings of jbierican cotton advance 

' '■ The Japanese Novem"ber imports of raw cotton amoimted to 316,000 
bales as compared with 274,000 "bales for the same month of last year, 
according to information received from Agricultural Commissioner 0. L, 
Dawson, at Shanghai. Cotton imports from the United States advanced 
sharply from 47,000 bales in October to 170, ^SOO bales in November. Im- 
ports of Indian cotton were lovrer than those of November 1935, but the total _ 
for the period September-November 1956 was 252,000 bales as against 188,000 
bales in a similar period a year ago. Imports of Brazilian cotton in 
November ajnounted to 25,000 bales as against 55,000 bales in October, but 
the total for Septombcr-November 1936 was 118', 000 bales compared with 8,000 
bales in a similar period a year ago, according to the report from Vice- 
Consul McConaughy at Osaka. On November 20 American Strict Middling and 
Indian Akola were quoted at 14,14 and 10,36 cents per pound, respectively* 

T/harf stocks of American cotton increased during the month of 
November by 100,000 bales, but the total of 240,000 bales is only slightly 
above the 5-year average. Production in the mills of the members, of the 
Japanese Cotton Spinners Association was maintained at 73.8 percent capac- 
ity, with 2 holidays per month. It is planned to operate at 75 percent 
during the first quarter of 1937 but reduce to 65 percent during the second 
quarter. Notwithstanding the planned curtailment, yam' pToductloh is ex- 
pected to be between 315,000 and 320,000 bales (of 400 pounds-) per fflonth 
during the second quarter of 1937. Yarn output in November amounted t^o 
318,000 bales. • ' 

Yarn prices advanced during the month *f November* Cotton prices 
were only a minor factor; the rise was chiefly due to a better domestic 
demand for yarn and cloth. Export of cloth during November amounted to 
215,000,000 square yards as against 233,000,000 square yards in -October. 
This reduction was compensated by an increased demand in the domestic 
market. 



JiPiN: Haw cotton imports, November 1936, with comparisons 
(in bales of f500 poimds) 



Growth 


November 


September-November 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 




Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


United States , , . . 

Others , 


156,000 
•75,000 
•11,000 

-22,000 


170,000 
44,000 
13,000 
16,000 
73,000 


274.000 
188,000 
18,000 
41,000 
40.000 


244,000 
252,000 
22 , 000 
39 , 000 
212,000 




274,000 


•316,000 
4 


561,000 


769,000 



Jan-j.ary 11, 1937 Toreign Crops and Markets 17 



JAPAM: TTharf stocks of raw cotton, Novein"ber 1936, with comparisons 

( In "bales of 500 pounds) 

1935 ■ 19 36 

'^yv^ '. NovemlDer \ OctolDer ; NoveralDer 

: Balfi^ ; B^.le^_ \ Bales 

United States : 60,000 • 139,000 : 240,000 

India : 74,000 : 190,000 i 131,000 . 

Others : 40 .000 j 10 8,00 0 ': 105,000 

Total ; 174,000 ; 437,000 i 476,000 



JAPAIT: Price per po-und of specified grades of cotton at Osaka, 

Novemt)er 1936 



1936 


American Strict 
Middling 


Indian Akola 






Cents 


Cents 


Average for 10 dfi^s 


ending : 










14.25 


10.36 




14.14 
14.22 


10.36 
10.42 








OILS 


A1''TD OILSEEDS 





Oriental vegetable oil situation 

Prod.uction of the leading vegetable oilseeds in China and Manchuria 
for 1936 is materially above that of 1935 when the crops were short, ac- 
cording to information received by radio from Agricultural Commissioner 
0. L. Dawson, at Shanghai. It is estimated that the available supply for 
export during the 1935-37 season will be larger than during the preceding 
year but will not be increased in proportion to the increase in production, 
largely because of the small carry-over of 1935 oilseeds and an expected 
increase in domestic consumption. A strong export demand from Europe has 
existed this season to date, while the United States demand has been slack, 
especially for those oilseeds on which excise taxes were increased last 
August . 

China 

The 1936 production for each of the principal vegetable oilseeds in 
China v/as estimated above the 1935 harvest, with the exception of rapeseed. 



18 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 2 



vriiich \7as the same as the preceding year. The 1936 crops vrere estimated 
atove 1935 production, according to the follovring percentages: Sesamum 
seed 7 percent, cottonseed 45 percent, peanuts 15 percent, soyheans 15 
percent, and flaxseed 30 percent. 

Toto.l exports from China of vegetable oilseeds and derived oils 
during the 1936-37 crop yCcar a.re not expected materially to exceed exports 
during the 1935-36 season. Exports of cottonseed, peanuts, flaxseed, and 
their derivative oils a,re expected to he someyha.t larger, ' while sesamum 
and rapeseed exports will "be smaller than the 1935-36 amounts. Available 
exports are not expected to he in proportion to the increased harvests on 
account of the following fa.ctors: (l) Low stocks carried over from the 
preceding year; (2) increased consumption, especially in some districts 
where late fall crops were reduced "by drought; and (3) holding "by farmers 
their oilseeds in some sections a.s a result of the poor prospects for the 
winter v/heat crop to "be harvested this spring. Sesamum and rapeseed ex- 
ports are expected to "be smaller this crop year largely "because of the 
new United States excise taxes. The United States has been the leading 
market for sesamum seed and has purchased the "bulk of rapeseed oil pro- 
cessed in Japan from Chinese-produced seed. Exports of sesamum seed to the 
United States for Octo"ber and Novemher 1936 amounted to 65,000 pounds 
compared with 16,000,000 pounds foj* the same 2 months of 1935. 

Prices for oilseeds in China arc a"bove those of a year ago as a re- 
sult of a general rise in prices for all food crops and the increased 
domestic demand. Present prices are somewhat too high to permit exports in 
any large quantities. Present stocks at export points are unusually low and 
transactions o.re very limited. If the outlook for 1937 spring crops should 
improve, farmers will undoxihtedly release some of their present holdings, 
resulting in large quantities available for export and somewhat lower prices. 

CHDTA: Exports of oilseeds and oils, 1934-35 and 1935-36 



Product : Crop year j 1934-35 i 1935-36 



: : 1,000 pounds : l.OOO pounds 

Rapeseed : May 1 - April 30 ... i 115,333 : 126,267 

Sesajmam seed i Oct.l - Sept. 30 ... : 245,467 ; 225,867 

Cotton seed : " " ... : 128,133 • 101,067 

Cottonseed oil • " " 18,400 23,867 

Soybeans i " " 1,867 j 19,333 

Peanuts, shelled : Kov.l - Oct. 31 ... ; 276,000 \ 103,600 

Peanuts, unshelled .. : " " ... : 74,533 i 59,733 

Peanut oil : " " ... : 84,933 i 71,867 



January 11, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



19 



CHINA: Exports of oilseeds and oils to the United States 
1934-35, and 1935-36 



Product 


Crop year 


1934-35 


1935-36 










1,00Q pounds 


1,000 pounds 




Oct. 


1 - Sept. 


30 .. 


146,000 


123,200 


Cottonseed oil ..... 


fl 


II 




0 


12,133 


Peanuts, shelled.... 


I'.ov, 


1 - Oct. 


31 . . 


667 


533 


Peanuts, unshelled.. 


II 


tl 




533 


533 




n 


It 




43,333 


51,067 











CHBIA: Spot prices at Shanghai, ex-warehouse, December 

1955 and 1936 



Product 


: Decemher 1935 


December 1936 




• Cents per riound 


Cents per pound 




. : 1.99 


2.33 




. j 0.54 


0.83 




. i 2.53 


3.22 




, i 1.30 


1.61 


Peanuts at Tsingtao (shelled) .. 


. : 1.72 


2.25 




. : 1.68 


2.27 . 



Manchuria 



The 1936 crops of soybeans, peanuts, cottonseed, and sesamum are larger 
than those of 1935, while the hemp and perilla seed harvests are smaller than 
in the preceding year, according to Mr. Dawson. The 1936 official estimates 
in thousand short tons compared with 1935 are as follows: soybeans, 4,602 
and 4,172 (the Shanghai office believes the 1935 crop was overestimated and 
should have been near 3,300); perilla seed, 155 and 200, and hempseed, 37 and 
50. The Shanghai office estimates the cottonseed crop 215 percent above the 
1935 production and the peanut and sesamum crops somewhat larger than in 1935. 

Exports of soybeans for the 1936-37 season are expected to be materially 
above the past crop year. Production of other 1936 food crops in Manchuria 
was large, and improved transportation facilities are expected to aid in malcing 
available the largest quantity of soybeans in recent years. Trade information 
indicates exports for October to December 1936 were above those for the corre- 
sponding period a year earlier. Germany, as a result of a trade agreement, 
has been the heaviest purchaser of soybeans this season. 

Exports of peanuts and cottonseed during the 1936-37 season are ex- 
pected to exceed those of last year, vfnile exports of perilla and hempseed will 
be curtailed because of the smaller crops and the higher United States excise 
taxes. 



20 



roreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 54, No. 2 



IvlAKCHimiA: Srports of oilseeds and oils, 1935 and 1936 



Product 



Crop year 



1934-35 



1935-36 



Soybeans . . . 
Soybean oil 
Perilla seed 
Perilla oil 
Hempseed . , . 
Cotton seed 
Sesaranm seed 
Peanuts, shelled 
Peanuts, Tonshelled 



Oct. 
II 

II 

II 

II 

11 

II 

Nov. 

II 



1 - Seut. 30 



1 - 



Oct, 31 ... 



1 , 000 poimds 

4,268,267 
212, 933 
.■ 130,933 
26,133 
182,933 
102,000 
59,333 
168,800 
70,000 



1 , 000 iDound; 

3, 992,133 
164,533 
262,133 
45,333 
135,200 
17,200 
3,867 
162,000 
46,933 



IvIANCHURIA; Spot price per pound of specified oilseeds at Dairen. 

ex-warehouse, 1935 and 1936 



Product 



1935 



, : Octob er 

' ' ■ ' i ' I ' ■ 

; Cent s 

Soybeans i * 1«26 

Perilla i .... 2.67 

Hempseed .......I 1.67 



Docemher 



Cents 

1.31 
1.77 
1.21 



193f 



October 



C ent s 

1.48 
2.27 
1.53 



Dec eaber 



Cents 

1.56 
2.37 
1.68 



Medit erranean Bg.sin supply of olive oil l ow 

The production of oil from the olive crop now being harvested in the 
producing countries of the Mediterranean Basin will be light and, with the 
exception of 1930-31, the smallest in recent years, according to a report by 
N. I. Nielsen, Agricultural Attache at Paris. Present indications are that 
the production will be even smaller than the forecast made last fal.l. It is 
believed that, inclusive of Spain, a total production of oil from the current 
crop of olives in the Mediterranean Basin countries will approximate 791,500 
short tons. If so, the season's prodaction will be under the 1,048,000 tons 
produced in 1935-36 and the 6-year average of 929,000 tons for 1929-30 to 
1934-35 . 



Although it is not possible to give a definite idea of the probable 
1936-37 production of olive oil in Spain, it seems that it will not be as 
large as predicted last fall. Aside from the fact that weather conditions 
were not entirely favorable during late summer, there is considerable doubt 
whether, under present civil war conditions, harvesting and pressing of olives 
will be carried on in a normal way. 



It is expected that olive oil production in the Mediterranean Basin 
countries, exclusive of Spain, will amount to about 406,500 tons as compared 



January 11, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



21 



with 498,000 tons estimated to have "been produced in the same countries 
during 1935-36 and approximately 25 percent under average, ^ith the ex- 
ception of France, Turkey, Yugoslavia, and French Morocco, it is expected 
fnat the season' s production of olive oil will "be under that of last season 
in all olive oil producing countries of the Mediterranean Basin. Moreover, 
indications are that the qua,lity of olive oil will, in general, "be "below 
aire rage. 

Only Turkey, Tunisia, and Algeria will have surplus olive oil a"bove 
normal domestic requirements, and in Tunisia, which is the most important 
country from the export viewpoint, the surplus will he a"bnormally small. 
The short supplies point to a continuation of the present relatively high 
prices; but, if conditions in Spain "become settled, it seems likely that 
some decline in prices will occur. 



LIVESTOCK, MEATS, AMD TOOL 
United Kingdom suspends hog contracts 

Failure to place 2,200,000 British hogs under contract to "bacon curers 
"by mid-Decem'ber resulted in the invalidation of all such contracts for 1937. 
According to Agricultural Attache C. C. Tayloi* at London, contracts made 
were short of the num"ber required "by more than 300,000 hogs, azid did not 
represent a proper "basis for bacon factory operation. This year, m<arketing 
authorities rejected the expedient of filling the contractual shortage by 
open-market purchases. So far, however, there has been no announced change 
in the cured pork import quota for the first 6 weeks of 1937, A total quota 
of 69,054,000 pounds was set, representing an increase of more than 6 percent 
over that granted for the corresponding 1936 period, and of nearly 12 percent 
over the rate in effect during the last 6 weeks of 1936. The United States 
is allotted the usual 8.1 percent of the total. 

Dissatisfaction with the operations of the British hog-marketing 
scheme was reflected in the failure of national hog numbers to increase 
materially. According to information now available, determination of a con- 
tract price acceptable to both hog producers and bacon curers has been the 
outstanding difficulty. As a result, hog numbers continuod inadequate for 
sustaining the authorities' plans to meet an increasing share of the national 
cured pork requirements from domestic supplies, while at the saiae time 
supplying most of tho fresh pork requirements. TTith respect to the current 
year's contracts, hog producers -jere reluctant to accept them, despite their 
relatively liberal terms, owing to the sharp a-dvajice in feed costs. It also 
appeared likely that, in view of the nmber of hogs sought for curing, prices 
for non-contract sales would be more attractive than the contract prices. 



22 



Foreign Crops and }<!tirkets 



Vol. 34, No. 2 



U nigaay cattle slaughter reduced 



Total cattle slaughter in Urag^j-ay for 1936 vdll "be smaller than 
the unusually large 1935 slaughter, according to Consul A. W. Ferrin at 
^'ontevideo. Figures for 11 months of 1936 indicate a decline of 15 per- 
cent from the nmber killed in the corresponding 1935 period. The cur- 
rent inf oraation is in line with that appearing in "Foreign Crops and 
Markets" of Becemher 7, 1936. Uruguay supplies alDOut half of the canned 
"beef imported into the United States. The smaller 1936 slaughter, however, 
has not prevented an upv7ard movement in the exports of canned heef , includin, 
that part of the exports sent to the United States. Exports of chilled and 
frozen "beef in 1936 were smaller than in 1935, 'ihe greater part as usual 
"being taken "by the United Kingdom. Uruguay killings of sheep and lara"b also 
were smaller in 1936, hut hog slaughter increased. 

URUGUAY: Livestock slaughter, "by months, 
January-j?ovem"ber, 1935 and 1936 



CATTLE 



SHEEP A^ID LAMBS 



Month 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 




l''Tum"ber 


Num"ber 


Numher 


Num'ber 


Num'ber 


Num'ber 


January .... 


96,555 


80,893 


139,101 


161,675 


3,607 


3,398 


Fe"braary . . . 


85,195 


89,290 


101.783 


153,961 


2,735 


3,410 


March 


108,722 


104,586 


43,447 


39,627 


3,479 


4,096 


April 


107,907 


93,077 


25,524 


10,595 


3,827 


4,378 


May 


108,062 


76,158 


12,871 


S,205 


5,050 


4, -9 36 


June 


92,892 


67,830 


7,434 


10,129 


5,514 


6,451 


J'oly 


74,174 


58,279 


1,727 


7,914 


^^,675 


7,938 


Augiast 


73,901 


53,005 


9,820 


11,356 


6,357 


9,106 


Septem"ber . . 


61,091 


60,695 


22,896 


15,079 


5,748 


7,094 


Octoher .... 


56,994 


55,495 


103,708 


120,616 


5,200 


5,926 


jJovem'ber , . . 


70,457 


43 , 241 


310,599 


218 , 329 


4,303 


5,478 


Total 


935,950 


782,549 


778,910 


755,486 


52,495 


52,211 



HOGS 



Australian wool prices move highe r 



Prices from 7 to 15 percent higher than those at the close of the 
preceding sales were registered at the opening on January 4 of the current 
series of wool sales at Sydney, Australia. According t'^ cahled advices 
from Assistant Agricultural Attaqhe P. G. Minnemsin at tondon, prices for 
best fleece advanced 5 to 7.5 percent, g*od fleece and "best skirtings 10 
percent, and average and faulty fleece 10 to 15 percent. Average skirt- 
ings advanced 7.5 to 10 percent. There was a good selection at the opening 
of the c^arrent series, and competition was keen. Japan, Yorkshire, and 
continental co^ontries all participated, with the United States also active 
in suitable lines. 



January 11, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



23 



BRITISH ?H0 ZEN POHK QUOTA: Allocations to the United Stat.^s, 19313-193' 



Period 


19.35 


1936 


1937 


Total 


Part for 
curin< 


Total 


Part for 
curing- 


Total 


Part for 

curin;i," 


Jan. 1-Mar. 31.. 
Apr. 1-J^jjie 30. . 
July 1-Sept. 30. . 
Oct. 1-Dec. 31... 


Founds 


Pounds 


Poland s 


Pounds 


Pounds 
4,. 591, 216 


Found s 


4,-584,496: 
2,844,800, 
2,834,608 
4,915,016 


a/ 294,000 
a/ 294,000 
294,000 
257 , 500 


4,584,49 6 
2,844,800 
2,834, 608 
4,916,016 


257 , 600 
b/ 257,600 
b/ 257,600 
\i 257,600 


257, 600 


15 ) 20 


1 , 139 , 600 


15 , 179 , 920 


1,030,400 







London office. Bureau of Agricultural Econorcics. 

a/ January 1-April 30, 39 2,000 pounds; May l-J^Jias 30, 19 6,000 pounds, 

of allocation for pork for curing as for cured pork. 

b/ Allocation made for April-December 1936 of 772,800 po-onds. 



Same periods 



Y/rSAT, INCLUDIHG FLOUF: Shipments from principal exporting countries 
as given by current trade sources, 1934-35 to 1936-37 



Count ry 



Total 
shipments 



1934-35 



1935-36 



Dec. 19 



Shipments 1936 
weak -ended 



Dec. 26- Jan. 2 



Shipments 
July 1 - Jan. 2 



1935-36 1936-37 



1 , 000 
bushels 



North America a/. . . 

Canada, 4 markets b/, 

United States c/. . . , 

Argentina 

Australia 

Bussia 

Danube and Bu.lgaria 

British India 

Total f/ 

Total European ship- 
ments a/ 

Total ex-European ship- 
ments a/ 



162,832 
175,059 
21, 532 



1 , 000 
bushels 

219 , 688 
246 , 199 
15.930 



1,000 
bushels 



1,000 
bushels 



1,000 
bushels 



1,000 
bushels 



3,416 
1 , 304 
247 



3,047 
1,456 
42 



3,239 
1,538 
193 



93,808 
166,981 
d/4.029 



186, 228 
111, 628 
1, 572 
4, 104 
c/2.318 



77,384 
110,060 

30,224 
3,216 
2^529 



1,828 
1,272 

0 

1,680 
72 



3,213 
2,057 
0 

1,344 

320 



4 , 103 
1,839 
0 

944 

0 



51,468 
45,852 
23,992 
7,408 
256 



46 8 , 782 



448 , 101 



222,784 



387, 752 



355,032 



T 

160,088 



147 , 938 



133,528 



•J 

^60 , 440 



1,000 
bushels 



144,772 
154,768 
d/5.185 



35,225 
36,304 
88 

41,088 
6.952 



264,429 

185,408 

i7 
62,928 



Compiled from official and trade sources, a/ Brocrahall's Corn Trade Hews, b/ Port 
''Tilliam, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and New "Westminster, c/ Official, 
d/ Data represent cumulations of weekly reports from certain ports and a,re not com- 
plete returns for exports from the United States, c/ Black Sea shipments only, 
f/ Total of trade figures includes North America as reported by Broomhall. g./ To 
Dec. 12. 



24 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 2 



MEAT: Closing Saturday prices of May futures 



Date 


Chicago 


Kansas City 


Minneapolis 


V'innipeg a/ 


Liverpool a, 


Aires ^/ 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


High c/ . . . . 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cent s 


Gent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


106 


136 


lo's 


130 


122 


144 


99 


129 


96 


133 


d/ 94" 


d/lOl 


Low c/ 


94 


112 


94 


108 


104 


120 


86 


106 


81 


110 


d/ 68 


d/ 91 


Dec. 12 


99 


125 


98 


119 


109 


133 


89 


117 


90 


123 


e/ 91 


e/ 93 


19 


100 


132 


99 


126 


108 


140 


88 


125 


92 


130 


e/ 91 


e/lOl 


26 


99 


136 


99 


130 


108 


144 


87 


129 


92 


129 


f/ 92 


f / 99 


31 


102 


135 


102 


130 


111 


144 


89 


129 


95 


133 


■f/ 93 


f /lOO 



other prices. c_/ Octoljer 1 to 
futures, f/ March futures. 



rate of exchange, b/ Prices are of day previous to 
date, d/ Febriaary and March futures, e/ Fehruary 



TCIEAT: TJeekly weighted average cash price at stated markets 





All classes 


No. 


2 


No 


, 1 


No. 2 


Hard 


No. 


2 


Tfe stern 


V/eek 


and grades 


Hard T7inter 


Dk.N. Spring 


Amher 


Durum 


Had T/inter 


IThite 


ended 


six markets 


Kansas City 


Minneapoli s 


Minneapoli s 


St. Louis 


Seattle a/ 




1935 


193 6 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Gex-its 


Cent s 


'"Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


High h/. . . 


112 


149 


123 


143 


139 


176 


121 


183 


113 


143 


90 


115 


Low "b/. • • . 


96 


126 


109 


120 


125 


139 


108 


135 


102 


118 


82 


96 


Dec. 12. . , 


97 


131 


110 


130 


125 


155 


113 


154 


103 


130 


83 


108 


19. . . 


102 


142 


111 


137 


128 


162 


116 


183 


107 


137 


87 


113 


26. . . 


103 


145 


113 


141 


129 


163 


112 


178 


108 


141 


88 


114 


31. . . 


107 


149 


118 


143 


135 


176 


119 


180 


111 


143 


90 


115 



a/ ¥eekly average of daily ca,sh quotations, basis No. 1 sacked, 
b/ October 1 to date. 

WHEAT: Price per bushel at specified European markets, 1935-36 and 1936-37 



Year 
beginning 
July 






Rotterdam 




Berlin 
c/ 




England 


Hange 


Hard 
TTinter 


Manitoba 


Argentina 


Australia 


Pari s 


and 
Wales 




No. 2 


No, 3 


a/ 


^/ 




Dom.es tic 








Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Gent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


19 35-. 3 6 d/ 


High 


103 


104 


93 ■ 


95 


229 " 


154 


81 


1936-37 d/ 


Low 


74 


82 


63 


71 


209 


121 


59 


High 


127 


145 


125 


141 


233 


204 


117 




Low 


101 


99 


99 


100 


209 


179 


91 


Nov. 26... 




115 


122 


112 


121 


214 




110 


Dec. 3... 




120 


123 


117 


130 


223 




111 


10. . . 




123 


136 


120 


133 


223 




113 


17. . . 




127 


145 


125 


141 


223 




116 



Prices at Paris are of day previous to other prices. Prices in England and Wales 
are for week ending Saturday. Conversions m.ade at current exchange rates, 
a/ Barasso. b/ E.A.Q. c/ Producer's fixed price from August 16, 1934. d/ July 
1 to date. 



January 11, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



25 



FEED GHAINS MD HYE: VTeekly average price per bushel of corn, rye, 
Oats, and barley at 1-eading markets a/ 





Corn 


-ye 


0 at 3 


Bar 


ioy" 




Chicago 


Buenos Airer 


Minneapoli s 


Chicago 


Minneapolis 


)7eek ended 


No 


. 2 


IHiture s 


i\it\zres 


No . 


2 


No . 


3 . . 


■No , 2 




Yellow 














V/hite 








1935 


193 6 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1935 




Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


High b/ 


96 


118 


90 


105 


40 


51 


80 


117 


58 


53 


113 


" 153 


tow b/ 


58 


59 


59 


59 


38 


47 


42 


- .48 . 


27 


25 


,41 


58 








• May 


May 


, Jan. 


Feb. 














Dec. 5.... 


59 


105 


59 


101 


38 


49 


47 


98 


28 


47 


55 


128 


12 


59 


107 


60 


102 


38 


49 


49 


100 


29 


50 


59 


129 












Feb. 
















19 


59 


107 


50 


103 


40 


50 


49 


113 


29 


52 


60 


131 


26 


58 


108 


60 ■ 


104 


■ 39 


49 


50 


115 


29 


52 


61 


127 




1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


Jan . 2 . . . . 


61 


108 


61 


105 


39 


50 


53 


117 


31 


53 


64 


130 



a/ Cash prices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices are simple 



averages of daily quotations, b/ For period January -1 to latest^date shovm. 



FEED GRAINS: Movement from principal exporting countries 



Commodity 
and 
country 



Exports 



Shipment s 1936-57, 



ExporTs as" far 



S.R. 

"o/ 



United States. . . 

Canada 

Argentina. . . 
Danube & U. S 
Total. . . 
OATS, EXPORTS 
United State 

Canada 

Argentina. . . 
Danube & U. S 
Total. . . 
GORN, EXPORTS 
United State 
Danube & U. S 
Argentina. . . 
South Africa 
Total. . . 
United State 
import 



S.R. 



d/ 



S.R. 



; for 


year 


week ended 


a/ 




as 


reported 


'• 1934-35 1935-36 


Dec. 19 


Dec. 26 ; 


Jan. 2 


July 


1 


1935-36 


1956-37 












to 




b/ 


^/ 


: 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 : 


1 , 000 






1 , 000 


• 1 , 000 


^bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels bushels 






bushels 


bushe].s 


; 4,050 


9,886 


0 


0 ; 


0 


Jan. 


2 


6,391 


O , %^ oo 


i 14,453 


6,882 








Nov. 


30 


3 , 848 


13 , 743 


' 20,739 


9,468 


33 






Dec. 


19 


2,871 


4,067 


; 11,250 


37 , 375 


1,296 


652 ' 


389 


Jan. 


2 


35,794 


20,884 


; 50,49 2 


63, 611 








48,904 


42 , 532 


: 1 , 147 • 


1,429 


0 


0 ; 


0 


Jan. 


2 


552 


378 


; 17,407 


i4,892 








Nov. 


30 


8,418 


5,573 


: 43,753 


• 9,790 


41 


620 ; 


77 


Jan; 


. n . 


6 , 224 


7 , 483 


: 8 , 444 


2,847 


0 


0 ; 


0 


Jan. 


•■y 


1,390 


800 


: 70,751 


28,958 








16,584 


14,234 












Nov . 


1 to 






: 880 


885 


0 


0 1 


0 


Jan . 


2 


45 


24 


: 14,939 


14,984 


519 


1 , 207 : 


731 


Jan. 


o 


2,639 


5,008 


i256,143 


307,439 


8,135 


8,799 : 


8 , 999 


Jan, 


2 


52,377 


76,014 


; 21,882 


8,910 


25 


17 : 


730 


Jan. 


2 


4,083 


2,277 


293,844 


3(^2 , 218 








59 , 145 


83 , 323 


; 41,141 


24,521 






Nov. 


30 


1,651 


6 , 263 



Y i ' , , 

'■'ompiled from, official and trade sources, a/ The weeks shown in these coli-imns a.re 

nearest to the date shown, b/ Preliminary. c/ Year beginning July 1. d/ Year 
beginning November 1. 



26 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



vol. 34, ITo. 2 



INDEX 



Late cables.. 13 



Apples and pears, import .quota for 

U. S. , France, January-March 1937. 13 

Barley, import duty, Germanj^, 

Jan. 1-Aug. 31, 1937 15 

Cotton: 

Imports, Ja.pa.n, November 1936 16 

Prices, Japan, Nov. 30, 1936 17 

Stocks, Japan, November 1936 17 

Flaxseed, area, India, 1937,, 13 

Grains (feed): 

Movement, principal countries, 

Jan. 2, 1937.^. 25 



Prices, princi;oal m.arkets, 

J an . 2, 19 o 7. «.•••••, ••«..*•••.. 2 



Livestock: 

Marketing scheme (hogs), 

U, K., 1937 , 21 

Slaughter, Uruguay, 

January-November 1935,1936 22 

Meat (pork, frozen), import quota 
for U. 3., U. K., January-March 

1937 13,23 

Oats, import duty, Germany, 



Jan. 1-Aug, 31, 1937 15 



Oils and oilseeds (vegetable): 
E:qD0r ts: 

China, 1934,1935, 18,19 

Manchuria, 1934,1935 20 

Prices: 

China (Shan:;hai), December 1936, 19 
Manchuria (Dairen), 

December 1936 20 



Page 

Oils m.d. oilseocls (vegetable), 
cont'd: 

production: 

China, 1936 17 

Manchuria, 1936 ' 19 

Olive oil, supply, Mediterranean 



Basin, 1936-37 20 

Oranges, import quota for U. S., 

Franco, January-March 1937 13 

Rye: 

Import duty, Germany, 

Jan. 1-Aug. 31, 1937 15 

Prices, U. S., Jan. 2, 1937 25 

Production, s'oecified countries, 

1933-1936..". 14 

Spelt, import duty, Germany, 

"jan. 1-Aug. 31, 1937 15 

l?7heat: 

I mp 0 r t du t y , Ge r many , 

Jan. 1-Aug. 31, 1937 15 

Imports (flour), China, 

November 1936 15 

Market conditions, China, 

Dec. 31, 1936 15 

Prices: 

Shangnai, Jan. 4, 1937 15 

Specified markets, 

'Dec. 31, 1936... 24 

Production, specified countriesi -- 

1933-1936 14 

Siiipments, principal coijntries, 

Jan, 2, 1937 23 

Wool, sales, Australia, 

Jan. 4-7, 1937 13,22